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Gardens woodland Wave Hill 33

Herbert & Hyonja Abrons Woodland

A taste of wooded wilderness in the Bronx

A half-mile trail leads along the slopes of this shady, eight-acre stretch along the western flank of the property.

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The first burst of color each spring is a river of blue "glory-of-the snow" (Chinodoxa sardensis) flowing down the slope. Demure wildflowers and ferns emerge in May.

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Woodland Walks

Color-coded trails link up to the half-mile trail running through the woodland. A trail map at the main entrances, north and south, indicates the character of each trail—from easy to moderately challenging.

Along the edge of the woodland below Glyndor Gallery is a bigleaf magnolia (Magnolia macrophylla). Planted almost a half-century ago, its leaves can reach almost three feet in length. A native of the southeastern U.S., it brings a subtropical feel to this part of the garden. In fall, look for its red, cone-shaped fruits; in May or early June, its enormous, white flowers perfume the air.

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More on the Herbert & Hyonja Abrons Woodland

Squill close up

Siberian Squill

The blue carpets at Wave Hill in spring are usually attributed to the thousands of lesser glory-of-the-snow (Chionodoxa sardensis). The truth is a little more complicated.

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Stylophorum diphyllum close up 2

Celandine poppy

Native to much of eastern North America, the celandine poppy is a welcome, self-seeding perennial that can light up a shady corner of the garden in spring.

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Geranium maculatum close up 2

Wild Geranium

In the wild, this species is commonly found in wooded places across much of eastern North America, and might even turn up as a welcome volunteer in gardens.

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