A public garden & cultural center

Beth Lipman

(Not So) Still Life 
Glyndor Gallery | April 5–July 4 

Beth Lipman, Cut Table, 2014, glass, wood, glue, paint, 80” x 72” x 26”. Courtesy of Claire Oliver Gallery, New York, NY.

Cut Table is an opulent, baroque arrangement of candlesticks and dishes, anchored by an apothecary jar. The precarious still life is barely contained by a slender, three-legged table that emerges from the wall at a skewed angle and is framed by fragmentary wallpaper, also executed in glass. It appears as though the transparent display of ghostly objects might crash to the floor at any moment. An ardent observer of the push and pull between abundance and decay in the long tradition of still life painting, Beth Lipman refers to the past stylistically, but creates an arrangement that speaks directly to the fragility of our times. The artist fabricates each individual glass object by blowing, solid sculpting, kiln forming and/or lampworking. The effusion of this piece contrasts with Sue Johnson’s Banqueting Table in the North Gallery, a work that features an orderly table that conforms to mid-20th century societal norms. 

Lipman’s work has been exhibited and collected widely, with solo exhibitions at the Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga, TN; John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, FL; New Britain Museum of Art, CT; Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA; and Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL; among others. Group exhibitions in New York include Collection Tableaux at the Jewish Museum and Eat Drink Art Design at the Museum of Arts and Design. Cut Table was recently exhibited in Crafted Objects in Flux at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA. She earned her BFA from the Tyler School of Art, Temple University.

The Arts at Wave Hill are supported by Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc., Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and by the Cathy and Stephen Weinroth Commissioning Fund for the Arts. 
 

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