A public garden & cultural center

David Opdyke

Seven Deadly Sins: Wrath–Force of Nature
Glyndor Gallery | June 7– September 7, 2015

 

Pictured above: Secondary Growth Line Extension, 2014, salvaged utility pole, wood, glass, steel, Styrofoam, paint, epoxy, cast urethane , 105" x 250" x 90". Courtesy of Magnan Metz Gallery, New York, NY

 

David Opdyke’s work represents an ongoing exploration of globalization, consumerism and civilization’s waste. He questions the promised advancement of mankind through technology. On the lawn next to the driveway that leads to Glyndor House, visitors encounter a 25-foot wooden utility pole cracked in two by a violent, unknown force. At the crossbeam, aberrant growths appear to regenerate from the collapsed giant. They resemble saplings at first, but closer inspection reveals them to be smaller versions of the telephone pole, as if the mysterious upheaval has caused it to spawn preternatural versions of itself. Complex, uncontrollable forces are at work, evoking feelings of being caught between rationality and chaos. A resulting awareness that our attempts to manage nature may well be futile is perhaps both frightening and freeing.

Opdyke has had solo exhibitions at Magnan Metz Gallery, Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, all in New York, NY, and Roebling Hall, Brooklyn, NY. He has created large scale installations at the Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY; the North Dakota Museum of Art, Grand Forks, ND; the Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, MA; the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; and a Brooklyn public school (commissioned by Percent for Art). Opdyke recently installed a major outdoor sculpture at the 2015 Havana Biennial. He earned a BFA in painting and sculpture from the University of Cincinnati.

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The Arts at Wave Hill are supported by Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc., Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and by the Cathy and Stephen Weinroth Commissioning Fund for the Arts. 
 

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