A public garden & cultural center

Elizabeth Bryant

(Not So) Still Life 
Glyndor Gallery | April 5–July 4 

Elizabeth Bryant, Greenhouse/Golden Checkered Warbler, 2012, archival inkjet print, 34” x 40”.Courtesy of the artist.

Elizabeth Bryant’s photographic tableaux feature found objects, photos and plants in spatial arrangements that create complex and often humorous hybrid forms. In this ongoing body of work, she constructs scenes in a variety of outdoor locations or greenhouses, using conventions from traditional still life painting. To assemble her visual compositions, Bryant arranges live plants and unclaimed student projects from the ceramics studio at California State University, Los Angeles, where she teaches, along with posters of animals and endangered species printed from images found online. Although they look digitally altered, the setups are photographed in a straightforward manner. Concerned with environmental issues around farming, industry and natural habitats, Bryant draws attention to how we comprehend photographic information. The odd juxtapositions in her photographs are her attempt to confer renewed value on endangered species and offer novel interpretations of discarded, handmade objects.

Bryant has presented her still life photographs in solo exhibitions at Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati, OH, and Solway Jones Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. Her work has also been featured in dozens of noteworthy group shows across the country, as well as in London, Paris and Dubrovnik. Bryant’s work is in several public collections, including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Cincinnati Art Museum and Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris. She earned an MFA from the University of Florida, Gainesville, and a BFA from Moore College of Art.

The Arts at Wave Hill are supported by Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc., Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and by the Cathy and Stephen Weinroth Commissioning Fund for the Arts. 
 

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