A public garden & cultural center

Jessica Jackson Hutchins

(Not So) Still Life 
Glyndor Gallery | April 5–July 4 

Jessica Jackson Hutchins, The Way That You Live, 2015, acrylic on printed canvas, glazed ceramic and folding chair, 58 x 65 1/2 x 3”. Courtesy of Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, NY. © Jessica Jackson Hutchins. Photo credit: Evan La Londe.

Jessica Jackson Hutchins is known for sculptures that combine ceramics and furniture. In recent wall-based works, such as The Way That You Live, the artist approaches painting as a sculptor, often leaving the stretcher bars partially exposed, revealing the three-dimensional structure. As with her sculptural work, Hutchins attaches household objects, like folding chairs and ceramic plates, to her abstract canvases. By incorporating these items that we use in everyday life, Hutchins imbues her works
with human emotion, memory and physicality. In creating hybrid juxtapositions, she transforms the domestic items from still life pieces into anthropomorphic expressions that are both playful and poignant. Ultimately, Hutchins explores the intimate coexistence of art and life. 

Hutchins has shown her sculptural installations, paintings, collages and large-scale ceramic works in recent solo exhibitions at Marianne Boesky
Gallery, New York, NY; Johann König, Berlin; The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, CT; Timothy Taylor Gallery, London; Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; and Atlanta Contemporary Art Center. She was featured in the 2010 Whitney Biennial and has work in numerous public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY, and the Seattle Art Museum. Hutchins received an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a BA from Oberlin College.

The Arts at Wave Hill are supported by Lily Auchincloss Foundation, Inc., Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and by the Cathy and Stephen Weinroth Commissioning Fund for the Arts. 
 

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